The Driving of the Green: 11 Cool Green Cars for St. Patrick’s Day

On St. Patrick’s Day, it’s traditional to wear or exhibit the color green to show your respect for Irish heritage. If you’re a car buff and would like to include your car in the parades and celebrations, you might have a problem. You see, green has never been a particularly favorite color among car buyers. A SwapALease.com survey (reported by Bankrate.com) analyzing vehicle colors on their website, listed green and dark green as tied for 21st place, just below beige and ahead of purple – the least popular color. Less popular than beige? Yikes.

Bankrate.com also reported that green’s popularity peaked in the ‘90s and there now seems to be a green backlash, with fewer green cars in showrooms and on the road. According to Bankrate, “If you still drive a green car, you may be OK with being a fashion laggard and in no rush to catch up with current trends.”

Here at TireBuyer, we don’t want our readers to be considered “fashion laggards” by anyone, so we’ve come up with a list of green cars that are cool enough for you to drive, even on St. Patrick’s Day.

American Cars

1956 Ford Thunderbird
1956 Ford Thunderbird

1956 Thunderbird: The two-seat Ford Thunderbirds are among the most recognized American cars. The ’55 Thunderbird was the first two-seat Ford since 1938 and created the “personal luxury car” market. The car was a success from the very beginning, with 3,500 orders being taken within the first 10 days following its introduction.

1958 Plymouth Savoy
1958 Plymouth Savoy

1958 Plymouth Savoy: The Plymouth Savoy was introduced in 1954 as a midline car between the upscale Belvedere and the base line Plaza. For our Irish fans, it was available in two shades of green – Misty Green and Ivy Green Metallic.

1965 Dodge Dart: The ‘65 Dart abandoned push-button actuation for the automatic transmission, returning to the more conventional shift lever. Dodge’s entry into the low-cost field successfully competed against the Chevy Nova and Ford Falcon.

1972 Corvette: 1972 marked the final year for Corvettes having chrome bumpers on both the front and rear – the front bumper would disappear in 1973. The second-most popular color for 1972 was Elkhart Green, following only Ontario Orange. Apparently it was easy being green in the 70s.

British Cars

1934 Jowett Long Four
1934 Jowett Long Four

1934 Jowett Long Four: The Long Four began production in the early 1920s, selling for about £245. By 1934 it was an aluminum-bodied four-seater saloon powered by a 907 cc flat 2-cylinder engine in the British 7 horsepower tax category.

1934 Austin 7 Ruby
1934 Austin 7 Ruby

1934 Austin 7 Ruby: The Austin 7 was an economy car and one of the most popular cars ever made for the British market. It gave thousands the opportunity to buy an inexpensive, reliable automobile. Over 290,000 were made between 1922 and 1939. Cost of the new Ruby saloon in 1934 was £120.

1935 BSA Scout: The Scout was a sporty two-seater powered by a 1,075 cc four-cylinder engine with a three-speed manual gearbox. With front-wheel drive and a very low center of gravity, the Scout was remarkably stable and could corner at speeds that were impossible in other cars.

1936 Austin 12/4 Eton Coupé: Known as the ‘Doctor’s Car’, the Eton Coupé was powered by a 1,525 cc four-cylinder engine that fell in the 12 horsepower class for British taxation purposes. Austin made many varieties of automobiles, and the 12/4 was a step up from the ubiquitous Austin 7.

1947 Jaguar 3.5 Litre Saloon
1947 Jaguar 3.5 Litre Saloon

1947 Jaguar 3.5 Liter Saloon: Production of the 3.5 Liter Saloon began in 1938 and, following a wartime pause, resumed in 1945 and lasted until 1948. During that time, 3,162 were made either as a Saloon or Drophead coupe. All were powered by the Jaguar 3.5 liter engine producing 125 horsepower.

Triumph Roadster (1948)

1948 Triumph: Designed to compete with Jaguar’s sports cars, the sporty Triumph did not achieve the performance of its competition. Autocar magazine’s test revealed a top speed of 75 mph and a 0 to 60 mph time of 34.4 seconds. With typical British understatement, they reported the performance as, “Satisfying, but not startlingly high.”

European Cars

Porsche 911T
Porsche 911T

Porsche 911T: Introduced in 1968, the 911T was the base model of the new 911. The amenities of the T were similar to the four-cylinder 912, but the T had the Porsche two-liter, six-cylinder engine producing 110 horsepower.

 

Photos by: Steve Glover (1, 2, 3), Nakhon100steviep187FotorusJohn MorrisJack Snell

 

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