Top Careers in the Auto Industry

The automotive industry employs over 8-million professionals worldwide. The United States accounts for nearly 1-million of them in automotive manufacturing, according to “Fircroft,” a prominent job and career website. That second figure doesn’t include all the other jobs in other areas of the automotive industry. Auto sales are expected to reach 79-million, according to “Statista,” a marketing data website. And those newly sold vehicles will need auto workers to keep them on the road.

Automotive technician

Also known as a mechanic, an auto tech repairs customer vehicles at auto shops. Their job requires them to inspect, diagnose, repair, and maintain a variety of vehicles, including cars, trucks, and SUVs. While an auto tech does perform regular maintenance such as tire rotations and oil changes, the majority of their work is diagnosing and repairing problems.

  • Education: Most employers require certification. There are many, but the most popular ones are through the Automotive Service Excellence. There are also certifications from specific brands such as Toyota, Ford, or Chevrolet.
  • Workplaces: Mechanics work for service shops, dealerships, and government agencies. Work is performed in a garage.
  • Pay: According to Glassdoor, the base pay for an automotive technician is $51,482.

Tire technician

Tire technicians perform tire maintenance: tire rotation, oil changes, checking and topping off fluids, as well as other maintenance work. Tire techs often work alongside auto techs.

  • Education: A tire tech doesn’t usually need any education besides a high school diploma or GED.
  • Workplaces: Tire techs work for service shops, dealerships, and government agencies. Work is performed in a garage.
  • Pay: Glassdoor states tire technicians make an average base salary of $27,226.

Automotive service manager

Service managers supervise the work of auto and tire technicians. They often work at a front desk where they greet customers and write up work orders. Service managers are responsible for ensuring work is being completed in a satisfactory and timely fashion. They maintain a safe and clean work environment for mechanics, order parts as needed, confirming any technician’s diagnoses, and supervising the technicians’ work.

  • Education: The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence offers a service manager certification. Some jobs require service managers to have a B.A. in automotive service management.
  • Workplaces: Service desk at auto parts and auto repair shops.
  • Pay: The average base pay for a service manager is $63,723, according to Glassdoor.

Automotive sales associate

They help customers find the right products for their vehicles. Customers come into the store looking for specific parts for their vehicles. The customers often work on their own cars or hire an outside mechanic.

  • Education: A knowledge of auto parts is necessary, along with a high school diploma or GED.
  • Workplaces: Auto sales associates work in auto parts stores.
  • Pay: The average base pay for an auto sales associate is $31,909, according to Glassdoor.

Automotive body technician

Also known as a collision repair technician, they focus on the body, interior, and frame, usually repairing damage caused in car accidents. They examine the damage and estimate the cost and time needed to fix the damage.

  • Education: Auto body technology certifications and degrees are available.
  • Workplaces: Auto body technicians work for service shops, dealerships, and government agencies. Work is performed in a garage.
  • Pay: Glassdoor states the average base pay for auto body techs is $54,528.

Automotive engineer

They’re responsible for designing new vehicles and improving on current models. They take into consideration a wide variety of vehicle features, including style and safety.

  • Education: Automotive engineers are usually required to have a B.A. in mechanical engineering.
  • Workplaces: Auto engineers work for vehicle companies such as Toyota, Ford, and Chevrolet.
  • Pay: The average base pay for automotive engineers is $75,357, according to Glassdoor.

Car sales consultant

They’re responsible for helping customers find the best vehicle for them within their budgets.

  • Education: High school diploma or GED is required. Stand out from the crowd with a B.A. in business.
  • Workplaces: Car sales consultants work for dealerships.
  • Pay: The average base salary for a car sales consultant is $47,783, according to Glassdoor.

Automotive detailer

A car detailer’s job is to restore a vehicle’s look by cleaning the interior and exterior of customer cars. A detailer’s job is to thoroughly clean every nook using the proper automotive cleaners. They also use waxes to protect the car from dirt, dust, and debris and polishers to get that super shine.

  • Education: High school diploma or GED required. Many receive on the job training.
  • Workplaces: Detailers can be self-employed or work for detailing companies.
  • Pay: The average base pay for automotive detailers is $12 an hour, according to Glassdoor.

These are just a few of the automotive careers you may want to explore. There are plenty of other jobs available in the auto industry. If you’re interested in working in the automotive industry, you can get training through Automotive Service Excellence or earn a degree in mechanical engineering, business or an automotive technology.

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